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Aboriginal Fiction & Literature e-Books   Tags: e-books, folklore, folktales, literature, mythology, novels, poetry, short stories  

This section contains novels, short stories, folktales, and poetry from Aboriginal writers or with an Aboriginal theme
Last Updated: Jun 27, 2017 URL: http://ncsa.libguides.com/fiction Print Guide RSS Updates
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Overview of Aboriginal Fiction

The links on this page are PDF versions of classic literature now in the public domain with full text made available by Project Gutenberg. Aboriginal peoples represented in these selected works are primarily within North America (Canada and the U.S.). Note: only text is reproduced. Any accompanying illustrations published in previous editions are not included and does not include the original pagination. To find a brief summary of each book, hover your mouse over the individual links.

Note that most of these books were written and published prior to 1923. Some were written by Indigenous people and others were written by settlers of European ancestry told on behalf of the Indigenous peoples they were chronicling. As these works were products of their time, they may contain language or depictions of Indigenous people that are antiquated by today's standards. As always, read with a critical mind.

For a guide on critically evaluating and selecting works of fiction for their depiction of Indigenous people, please consult "How to Tell the Difference: A Guide for Evaluating Children’s Books for Anti-Indian Bias"

Further Aboriginal Literature Web Links

  • Discovering Aboriginal Literature
    A blog post from author Waubgeshig Rice meant to accompany the CBC documentary series, "8th Fire," Rice discusses the importance of Aboriginal literature and the influence it had on him in shaping his own identity.
  • Aboriginal Authors Index (University of Saskatchewan Library)
    Works of fiction, poetry and drama written by First Nations, Métis and Inuit authors (who have a connection to Canada) can be found here. Listings of each author's individual works will direct you to the University of Saskatchewan Library's catalogue page.
  • Aboriginal Children's Literature
    Maintained by the University of British Columbia Library, this guide is an introduction to finding Aboriginal children's and young adult literature, Aboriginal authors of children's literature, and materials about Aboriginal children's literature.
 

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Other Guides to Check Out

For other relevant guides, please check out the following.

Aboriginal Non-Fiction e-Books
by Stefanie Varze - Last Updated Jun 27, 2017
This sections contains e-Books on topics such as: tribal ethnography, biographies, Aboriginal crafts and customs, history, and more
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Selected Titles From The BearPaw Library

The titles below represent a selection of book titles available within our physical BearPaw Library.

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The Beginning of Print Culture in Athabasca Country - Patricia Demers (Introduction by, Translator); Naomi L. McIlwraith (Translator); Dorothy Thunder (Translator); Arok Wolvengrey (Foreword by)
Call Number: REF 242.802 BEG 2010
ISBN: 9780888645159
Publication Date: 2010
"The Beginning of Print Culture in Athabasca Country is a rare gift to our society and a tangible piece of history. Anyone interested in language, culture, the making of books, the history of publishing, and the process of settlement in western Canada will find in these pages a wealth of information to feed the soul. Father Emiole Grouard was a man of many talents, among them an aptitude for languages. During his long life in western canada, he learned to speak several First nations languages fluently, keeping meticulous notes of his work. After an initial decade at Fort Chipewyan and a brief convalescence in France, he returned to the Canadian West, bringing with him a small hand printing press. As was the case with many nineteenth-century missionaries, Father Grouard set out to print in the language of his mission almost as soon as he arrived. Among the first fruits of his endeavours was the Prayer book reproduced in these pages."

Books in Native Languages in the Rare Book Collections of the National Library of Canada - Canada. National Library of Canada.
Call Number: 016.497
ISBN: 0660530309
Publication Date: 1985
"The first edition of this checklist was published by the National Library of Canada in March 1980 at the request of the Committee on Library and Information Needs of Native Peoples of the Library Association. That edition included 295 titles in 44 languages. The revised and enlarged edition comprises more than 500 titles in 58 languages or dialects. It includes only pre-1950 imprints: books in native languages as well as dictionaries and grammars for studying and learning native languages held in the collection of the Rare Book Division and in the Printed Collection of the Music Division are listed."

About Indians: A Listing of Books - Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs.
Call Number: 016.97 ABO
Publication Date: 1975
"This bibliography has been compiled to provide information to the many teachers, librarians and other people interested in books written by or about Indians.
The bibliography is made up mainly of books about the native peoples of North America, although a few books about South American Indians have also been included. Those having Canadian authorship or specific Canadian interest have been indicated by an asterisk."

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