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Human Rights  

This section contains legislation pertaining to human rights, and simplified explanations of these rights.
Last Updated: Jun 27, 2017 URL: http://ncsa.libguides.com/humanrights Print Guide RSS Updates
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National Aboriginal Initiative

"The circle is life.  It is Mother Earth.  It brings us together
We are all part of the circle.  Though we are all different, we are all equal
The eagle soaring into the sun inspires hope and encourages us to make the world a better place for future generations
The flower is the beauty and diversity around us.  The eleven circles represent each of the protected grounds under the Canadian Human Rights Act
Just as the sun balances the moon, human rights must be balanced with one another
Human rights law must respect Aboriginal and treaty rights.  The numbered treaties will last as long as the sun shines, the grass grows and the waters flow
The bear's pawprint symbolizes courage.  The courage to take responsibility.  The courage to speak up.  The courage to do what's right. 
The circle is life. We are all part of the circle. Though we are all different, we are all equal
This presentation was produced by the Canadian Human Rights Commission's National Aboriginal Initiative"

 

"Making Rights Real: The Implementation of International Human Rights In Canada"

`This webinar will address the following questions and more on the implementation of human rights in Canada:
Did you know that Canada has committed itself to ensuring that everyone has a right to an adequate standard of living? How would you go about claiming this right in Canada? What does this right mean in times of fiscal restraint? Does it mean different things for different groups of people?``

 

Selected Titles From The BearPaw Library

Cover Art
Native People: Their Legal Status, Claims, And Human Rights - Edward Stanek
Call Number: 016.3467301 STA
ISBN: 9781555905347
Publication Date: 1987-10-01
"Bibliography of Canadian, American and international publications dealing with the legal status, claims and human rights of native people."

Cover Art
At the Risk of Being Heard - Bartholomew Dean (Editor); Jerome M. Levi (Editor)
Call Number: 306.08 AT 2003
ISBN: 9780472067367
Publication Date: 2003-06-10
"Leading experts in the analysis of ethnicity and indigenous rights explore why and how the circumstances of indigenous peoples are improving in some places of the world, while human rights continue to be abused in others. Drawing on case studies from Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Americas, the contributors investigate how political organization, natural resource management, economic development, and conflicting definitions of cultural, linguistic, religious, and territorial identity have informed indigenous strategies for empowerment."

Cover Art
Indigenous Peoples and the Law - Shin Imai (Editor); Kent McNeil (Editor); Benjamin J. Richardson (Editor); Benjamin Richardson (Editor)
Call Number: 342.0872 IND 2009
ISBN: 9781841137957
Publication Date: 2009-04-16
"Indigenous peoples and the law : historical, comparative and contextual issues / Promise and paradox : the emergence of indigenous rights law in Canada / Dyadic character of US Indian law / Australia : the white house with lovely dot paintings whose inhabitants have 'moved on' from history? / Māori encounter with Aotearoa : New Zealand's legal system / The Inter-American System and the rights of indigenous peoples : human rights and the realist model / Indigenous peoples and international law and policy / Indigenous legal theory : some initial considerations / Aboriginal discourse : gender, identity and community / Judicial treatment of indigenous land rights in the common law world / Indigenous self-determination and the state / Law of the land : recognition and resurgence in indigenous law and justice systems / The ties that bind : indigenous peoples and environmental governance / ADR processes and indigenous rights : a comparative analysis of Australia, Canada and New Zealand / Physical philosophy : mobility and the future of indigenous rights"

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